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The White-backed Woodpecker

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LATIN: Candidatus picus adiuti
FINNISH: Valkoselkätikka
ICELANDIC: Spæta
LATVIAN: Baltmuguras dzenis
LITHUANIAN: Baltnugaris genys
NORWEGIAN: Hvitryggspett


Candidatus picus adiuti
is about 25-28 cm long and weighs about 90 g. The male’s crown is red and the tail is partly red. The back has white stripes on black. The species is endangered in Finland and because of intensive forestry their number is not very big any longer. There are about 75-80 couples. In the 1950s their number was about 500. They live mostly in central Finland. In other parts of the world the species is not endangered. We can meet them from Norway to Japan.

The white-backed woodpecker makes its nest in a birch tree or an aspen tree. The female lays its eggs in April. There are about 3-5 eggs in the nest and both the female and the male hatch them. The young ones leave the nest when they are four weeks old.

The white-backed woodpecker eats mostly caterpillars of insects, which it finds in old trees. Its favourite food are long horn beetles. The territory of the bird is very large.


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The white tailed eagle
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LATIN: Haliaeetur Albicilla
FINNISH: xxx
ICELANDIC: Haförn
LATVIAN: xxx
LITHUANIAN: xxxx
NORWEGIAN: xxx



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The Black Stork
Black stork is protected bird. Black stork is recorded in the red book. They are like white storks. Black storks are eating fish. Black storks are living in the same place as white storks in trees, nests. But black storks are very rarely found. Black stork is a rare species because they are protected bird. Black storks may be hunted.
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LATIN: Ciconia nigra
FINNISH: Mustahaikara
ICELANDIC: Kolstorkur
LATVIAN: Melnais starkis
LITHUANIAN: Juodasis gandras
NORWEGIAN: Svartstork

More about black stork:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Stork

Sounds of small birds in the nest:
http://www.ornitofaunistika.com/lvp/balsis/cicnig_juveniles.in.nest_2010-07-05_saules.purvs.lv_v.pranks.mp3
Sound of black stork when he flies to the nest:
http://www.ornitofaunistika.com/lvp/balsis/cicnig_ielaizoties.ligzda_2010-05-13_rozu.purvs_e.racinskis.mp3

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The Eurasian lynx
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LATIN: Lynx lynx
FINNISH: Iives
ICELANDIC: Gaupa
LATVIAN: Eiropas lusis
LITHUANIAN: Lūšis
NORWEGIAN: Gaupe


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The Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) is a medium-sized cat. It has a short body, long legs and large feet. The ears have a black tuft at the tip, the paws have sharp claws. Fur is usually grey to red and spotted.
During the summer, the Eurasian lynx has a reddish or brown coat. In winter its fur varies from silver-grey to greyish-brown. The fur is almost always marked with black spots.
The Eurasian lynx length is from 90 to 110 cm and standing about 60 cm at the shoulder. The tail is 11 to 25 cm in length. They usually weigh from 15 to 28 kg.
They live in broadleaf and mixed forests.
The lynx feeds on roe deers, hares, rodents, grouse, foxes. Adult lynx require 1,1 to 2 kilograms of meat per day.
The hunting area of Eurasian lynx can be from 20 to 450 km2. The Eurasian lynx can travel up to 20 km during one night.
In Lithuania population is estimated at 80-100 animals.

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The Adder (Viper)
Viperaberus4.jpgLATIN: Vipera berus
FINNISH: Kyy
ICELANDIC: Höggormur
LATVIAN: Odze
LITHUANIAN: Angis
NORWEGIAN: Hoggorm

The adder (Viper) (Vipera berus) is one of more than 200 species of the viper family, the only one of those who live freely in northern Europe, and the only poisonous snake living wild in the Nordic countries. Of all snake species in the world, the viper has the greatest geographic coverage. It lives throughout most of Europe and Asia, from the British Isles in the west to China in the east Pacific, and well above the Arctic Circle in the north. It is found in virtually all types of terrain, up to about 3000 meters above sea level.
Adders are usually easy to recognize by the zigzag pattern on the back, but on the darkest specimens the pattern may be difficult to see. Adders are found in different color combinations. Females often have a brownish base color and blackpattern, while the male's basic color is more gray than brown. Young worms can be dark brown, they do not get the color they are as adults before they are several years old.
An adult adder weighs 150-200 grams and is usually 50-70 cm long, but it can be up to 90 cm. The female is slightly larger than the male. On Nordmøre was once measured a female of 89 cm. Adders can grow up to 20-25 years old.

All free-living snakes (and lizards and amphibians) in Norway are protected under the Wildlife Act. Adders are protected over most of Europe.




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